Thomas L. Robinson, served in the Red Cross from 1917-1919 during the Great War (1914-1918).  He volunteered for service in the American Red Cross when the United States entered the conflict, first serving in France and Belgium and later Italy.   At the end of the war, he remained in Europe to arrange loans to Germany in support of the rebuilding of its infrastructure.   Robinson returned to New York City and during the '20s worked in banking. After the crash of 1929, he moved to Europe and lived the rest of his life in Zurich where he taught economics and history at the university.  He died there in 1940 on the eve of the second World War, convinced that flawed treaties and the heavy reparations demanded of a defeated Germany after WW1 were a major contribution.
Following his journal, Bonnell Robinson traveled sites along the Western Front in France and Belgium, the Southern Front in Italy, Austria and Slovenia, and was overwhelmed by the scale of the conflict and the still visible remnants of battle. She found fields thinly layered with new growth but scarred and rippled from filled trenches. Un-detonated shells along the Somme and the Marne are still piled in corners of fields by farmers for disposal. By chance, in Ypres she was told about a trench excavation, where they removed the body of a British soldier.   
The First World War has been overshadowed by the second, but in many ways we can see both wars as two chapters of a single conflict that began in 1914 and ended in 1944.  
Bonnell Robinson

Bonnell Robinson